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google chrome security settings - Chrome to Soon Get HTTPS-Only Mode for Secure Browsing
Chrome to Soon Get HTTPS-Only Mode for Secure Browsing

Google Chrome is set to soon get a mode that will use HTTPS for all sites visited by the browser.

Once this feature is activated, any website with an unsecured HTTP protocol will be automatically upgraded to use HTTPS encryption if it is available. 

Chrome already defaults to using HTTPS protocol if a protocol isn’t specified.

Google Chrome will soon have an ‘HTTPS-only mode’ for simpler, more secure browsing. 

According to 9to5Google, Google is currently testing the new ‘HTTPS-only mode’ for Chrome. The code for this was found on the Chromium Gerrit site.

It is hidden behind a flag on chrome://settings/security. When you look at it, it is expected to be available for Chrome for Web, Android, and Chrome OS.

Once you turn on HTTPS-only, it will appear on the Security page in Chrome. It will be next to “Always use secure connections to activate the secure browsing mode.” When you turn it on, it means that all connections are encrypted.

Chrome will automatically redirect websites from HTTP to HTTPS if you turn on the ‘HTTPS-only mode.’ But only links that you click on or enter will be upgraded.

In some cases, the website has not been updated to HTTPS. If it is old or disabled, you will see a warning before seeing the website. Chrome will not allow this.

It is expected that this setting will only inform users if the website they want to browse is not available in HTTPS protocol, so users would need to bypass it in order to access it.

The move would make it more difficult for attackers or hackers who may compromise your computer over an unencrypted connection to intercept and read sensitive data like passwords or credit card numbers.

What is HTTPS?

Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) is the secure version of HyperText Transfer Protocol (or transfer protocol). It was originally created by Netscape in 1994.

The “S” stands for “Secure.” The S also signifies that the website has been verified to be reliable, authentic, and trustworthy.

HTTPS is the common protocol for secure transactions on the web, such as online purchasing or banking. It encrypts data sent between your computer and a server to prevent anyone from eavesdropping on those communications (eavesdropping means listening in).

It also helps protect against “man-in-the-middle” attacks where someone tries to intercept communications between your computer and website.

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